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Reebok Body Trec Elliptical Trainer

Reebok Body Trec Elliptical Trainer

Author's Rating: Rating: 3/5 stars
2 Reviews from Epinions.com

By:   jo.com
Jun 25, 2007
Reebok Body Trec Elliptical Trainer

Reebok Body Trec Elliptical: My Thoughts

Author's Rating: Rating: 3/5 stars

Pros: small; functional

Cons: basic; no heart rate; noisy

The Bottom Line: 
This machine has a terrible warranty. For that reason alone I am only rating it average. For the right price I'd take a chance.

Author's Review
I used the Reebok Body Trec Elliptical Machine while at an RV resort.

If you are trying to decide among cardio vascular equipment I can’t tell you what to buy. I can tell you that I like using elliptical machines. I find them gentle on my joints. I also find that they burn more calories than walking on a treadmill unless you have that treadmill at a very high angle. They are considered a safe, low impact cardio vascular (heart/lung) workout.

About the Reebok Body Trek:

I noted that this is a compact machine. At 65" long by 28" wide by 64.25" high it fits easily anywhere. The machine weighs about 230 pounds and has a maximum user weight of 300 pounds.

I stepped onto the pedals which had plastic pieces at the toe which kept my foot in place.

There were two moving arms that work with the pedals. The disadvantage to this (rather than a machine whose arms don’t work with the pedals and are independent) is that the arms can move your feet and vice versa making it easy to "cheat" when the arms and pedals work together.

It offers a nice 21-inch stride.

This machine doesn’t fold; doesn’t have heart rate sensors and for somewhere in the under $1000 range you will get a 6-month warranty.

Reebok’s Body Trec has 8 pre-set programs. These include manual and quick start (which I don’t consider programs); walk in the park; steady climb and random. The programs (not quick start or manual) tell the machine what resistance to use. If I chose manual or quick start I could use the arrows to incline, decline, raise or lower the intensity on my own as I work out. The intensity went from 1 to 10.

Console:

The console has a 14x30 LED matrix that showed calories burned, calories per hour, distance, speed and time elapsed and remaining.

It was easy to read. Note that this machine as I said had no heart rate sensors however it said on it that it could be set up to display heart rate. Because of this heart rate was displayed on the console. You would have to have a chest strap to show your heart rate.

The machine didn’t have a fan. This was a fairly basic machine.

Let’s use it:

I got on and hit start. I then picked interval for my program and hit enter. I then picked the level I wanted via numbers on the console that went from 1 to 10 and hit enter. I then chose how long I wanted to work out and hit enter and my weight and hit enter. These last two were also changed with the up and down arrows.

I found the machine noisy and not very smooth.

Jo’s Final Thoughts:

My notes say that the machine isn’t bad for home use and if it was inexpensive. If you find this online for $500 then I’d say it will do the trick. I could justify the noise by virtue of how much use the machine gets.

I'm giving this an average rating. I didn't love it; I didn't hate it. The Reebok Body Trec was a functional machine that gave me enough programs not to get bored. It isn't as sophisticated as others even in the same price range and the pedals weren't the most comfortable I've used.


 


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